Memories Of My School Days

Memories Of My School Days

School Days Memories

I was using my sewing machine yesterday and it made me think of my school days. When I was around thirteen years old I did ‘Domestic Science’ at school; half the year was spent cooking and the other half sewing.

My teacher was called Miss Stuart and she was so strict that you were terrified of doing anything wrong. You had to cut your pattern so perfectly, then tack and finishing the article of clothing on a sewing machine. The stitching had to also be in a perfect straight line and your button holes made to look like shop ones.

If you did anything wrong, she would just rip your sewing apart and make you start all over again. But, for all her strictness, I developed a love of sewing and it has stayed with me my whole life.

My Geography teacher was called Miss Banwell and she was a large lady with a large personality. She gave us all a thirst for travel with her stories and films of when she lived in Africa. The lessons were interesting even though we also had to do a lot of boring work such as map building and drawing plateaus!

English was my favourite lesson, especially Literature, thanks to Miss Goddard. She was a little lady who inspired us all in the pursuit of reading. I still remember reading Jane Eyre for the first time and being absolutely enthralled.

Then came History, which I adore now but my teacher was the most boring teacher you could ever wish for. We would walk into her classroom and she would already be writing on the first part of a three part blackboard. We were told to copy down all her writing from the three boards.

Sometimes, in the lesson, she never discussed anything she had written. The bell would go for the end of the lesson, she would say ‘see you next time’, and leave the classroom. Over the years I have developed my own passion for historical fact but not through her, and the proof is that I cannot remember her name.

I loved Algebra taught by a Scots Lady who was a brilliant teacher, but sadly I cannot recall her name. I remember one time that she called me and a friend to her at the start of class to discuss our homework. (I used to give mine to a girlfriend for her to copy if she had not done hers). She told us that she knew one of us was copying from the other, she did not need to say who, but suggested that the girl copying tried it on her own, as she would never pass her exams!

I love these memories of so many years ago and I did so love my time at school. It has made me the person I am today.

Jo Tempest.

Bikers Visit Selimiye

Bikers Visit Selimiye

Bikers Visit Selimiye

I wandered into the village yesterday and as I walked, I heard that wonderful deep roar of many large motor bikes. Following the sound to the waterfront, I came across many leather clad bikers parking their ‘beasts’ by my friend Nese’s cafe.

They settled and ordered coffee and beers.

Never to miss a great article for my blog, I ventured over to their tables and being me, asked if they would pose with their bikes, as it was such an unusual sight for Selimiye.

Bikers And Me

Bikers And Me

 

I told them I would post an article about them on my blog.

They were so sweet, belying their look. Up they got and stood smiling by their bikes.

I requested scowls as much more fitting, and then they said they wanted a photo with me. I felt absolutely dwarfed by one of them!

 

 

 

 

 

Row Of Motorcycles

Row Of Motorcycles

Anyway, I got my photos and they took my blog details as they were bemused that I wanted to put them on my blog. After a couple of hours, they donned their leathers and helmets to drive off into the sunset, leaving us a great memory of the Izmir Bikers.

Jo Tempest.

My New Smart Phone – Smarter Than Me!

When I was back in England a few weeks ago to visit my sons and family, my

My New Smartphone

My New Smartphone

darling brother, Mark, felt I needed a new smart phone instead of my little flip phone.

He said it would give me access to the Internet, etc. when I was over in England, which is true. Much better than having to access any available computer when I visit my sons or friends.

But one thing you have to know about me is that I am definitely not tech savvy! I have learned what I need to learn to be able to write my Bad Girls series, but my wonderful girlfriend, Carolyn, does all the magic to get them published.

I can load my photos onto my laptop, post them on Facebook, send files, and play Word Scrabble, but much more than that baffles me. So there I am with this wonderful present and little instruction.

It took me days to work out how to just add my contacts, delete my old text messages, and set up the Internet!

I realise I am not a technical person; I much prefer doing something creative, which is why I love researching and writing my books. I know I have to be in the 21st Century but I have been dragged kicking and screaming to arrive there.

I will persevere as it is a great present and I am sure I will enjoy using it, once I have mastered the little devil!
Jo Tempest

Girl Power Magic Publications is proud to announce The Mistresses, True Stories Of Lust, Love, and Loss, the fourth book in my series, “The Bad Girls,” now available for Kindle and Amazon Cloud.

The definition of a mistress ‘is a man’s long term female lover and companion who is not married to him’. It is especially true when the man is already married to another woman. They do not usually live openly together and the relationship is secret. Today, mistresses have a much easier time as the rules are different.

The Mistresses - The Bad Girls Series Book 4

The Mistresses

In this book, you will read about true, enduring love stories lived by 12 women, and may even find you have sympathy for many of these women; I did.

You will read about the mistress to a British royal; they lived openly together for nearly 20 years, had 10 children and the approval of the Royal family. But then they were torn apart because all the Royal heirs to the throne had died and he had to take his place as King of England and marry a suitable princess.

One was mistress to an American president and although his wife would have given him a divorce to be with the woman he loved, his mother threatened stopping all the family money to ruin his chances of becoming president. So they met in secret and she was even with him when he died.

One of my mistresses was executed with her lover even though she was given the chance to go free. One mistress had to live in the same home while her husband had his mistress move in to the home, and she was not allowed to go and live with her lover, and give up her ‘love child’.

In the past, women did not have the rights and ease as many do now to choose their own lives, and so would suffer the scorn or secrecy involved with being with the man they truly loved. All of the men in these stories were powerful men and I am sure that is a great attraction to a woman, but with that comes the difficulties of being together.

I have spent a lot of time researching and writing this book so that I could give you the stories not only from the mistress’s point of view, but also her lover and his wife. Then you can truly see how their three lives crossed and divided.

So, download my fourth book in my Bad Girls Series to read 12 intimate biographical tales of Lust, Love and Loss to make up your own mind about the life of a mistress in times past.
Jo Tempest.

Some Of My Favourite Moments in Selimiye

I love where I live in a small coastal town in Turkey, called Selimiye. Beautiful scenery, true village life as well as many international visitors on their luxurious yachts. It is a fascinating place with many foreigners (as well as me), living here.
I want to share with you some of my daily sights.

Jo Tempest

 

Neighbor Gathering Olives

Neighbor Gathering Olives

Running Stream

Running Stream

Friends and Dogs

Friends and Dogs

Local Farm Animals

Local Farm Animals

5 Minutes Away

5 Minutes Away

Laurel and Hardy

Laurel and Hardy

Mediterranean

Mediterranean

 

The Shed That Creates Music

Songs From The Shed

Songs From The Shed

A musical shed? Yes, there is one and it’s hidden away in Somerset in the English countryside. It’s a former war army billet shed but has now found a great new use.

A guy called Jon and some of his friends started filling the shed with a collection of curiosities and they originally used it as a place to enjoy cider and cheese, both great examples of Somerset life.

A decision was made to have some musicians to play on their first meeting and from then on, it became known as “Songs from the Shed”.
It has featured in a BBC documentary as well as in many national and local newspapers. Local radio stations as well as BBC Radio 1,2,3 and 5 have played the music that comes out of the shed.

It has become so popular that bookings are now one year ahead for artists who want to perform inside and they have some really great talent squeezing inside to create their music.

One such band is ‘Bann’ who include double bagpipes in their music. They certainly left everyone with their ears ringing when they left, but what a great sound! The band has been described, “Like a Highland army advancing out of the mountain mist” and, “Like an uncompromising force”.

A while ago, it was noticed that the shed was suffering from woodworm and it could not be lost! So, many artists donated their songs for CD’s that could be sold to raise the money so that the shed could be treated for the woodworm and carry on being a meeting point for great music.

You can also purchase “Songs from a Shed” t’shirts and other goodies at this link here that help to keep Jon and his friends sharing their fun venue.
It has won ‘Shed of the Year’ and I think it is an honor it greatly deserved.

My Love of Sewing

1949 Singer Sewing Machine

1949 Singer Sewing Machine

I love to sew but do not have a sewing machine, as there always seems to be something else I need to spend my money on. But I have a lovely friend here, Jenny, who has a beautiful little hotel called ‘Jenny’s House’.

Anyway, she realised I was sewing my curtains by hand and offered me hers to use. What bliss!

Around the same time, a friend posted this on FaceBook which made me giggle and I so want to share it with you….then I will give you my version.

Advice From The 1949 Singer Sewing Manual

1……Prepare yourself mentally for sewing. Think about what you are going to do…never approach sewing with a sigh or lackadaisically. Good results are difficult when indifference predominates.

2……Never try to sew with a sink full of dirty dishes or beds unmade. When there are urgent housekeeping chores, do these first so your mind is free to enjoy your sewing.

3…..When you sew, make yourself as attractive as possible. Put on a clean dress.

4…..Keep a little bag full of French Chalk near your sewing machine to dust your fingers at intervals.

1940s Dress Pattern

1940s Dress Pattern

5…..Have your hair in order, powder and lipstick on. If you are constantly fearful that a visitor will drop in, you will not look neatly put together and you will not enjoy your sewing as you should.

This is Jo Tempest 2015

1….I do not usually know what I am going to sew, I wait to be inspired.

2….The sink is full of dirty dishes but the bed is made! There are lots of other jobs İ should be doing, but keen to sew!

3…..Not looking very attractive as still in my pajamas.

4…..No French Chalk!

5…..Hair in a scrunch, cleaned my teeth but no lipstick. If a friend drops by, they will just be impressed with my sewing!

As you can see, a lot has changed in the last 60 years, but I am so happy sewing on my borrowed Singer sewing machine. Thank you so much, Jenny, and I hope your dogs loved their coats I made them for the cold winter nights.

Jo Tempest.

The Interesting History Of Paint

Dendera Temple Paintings

Dendera Temple Paintings

Like me, have you recently been down to your Local DIY store, walked along aisles of paint in every colour and finish, to select what you need for your home? I am sure you have, but have you ever taken the time to think about how the amazing selection of paint arrived on those shelves?

Well, if you haven’t, then I am going to tell you, because these sort of facts fascinate me, and you know I like to write about them.

Paint appeared 40,000 years ago with the earliest cave paintings, where they used pigments of colour from plants and berries and their fingers to spread the paint. Much later, in Dendera in Egypt, the 2000 year old walls showed fantastic painted images that were still bright, even though they had been exposed to all weathers. The Egyptians worked with six main colours: Blue, Red, Green, Yellow, Black, and White.

They didn’t seem to mix their colours to produce new ones at this time. Their paint was made with egg yolks to create a substance that would stick to the walls. To this would be added the pigment from plants, soil and sand, having used water or oil as a base.

 

Emerton Manby

Emerton Manby

Paint was here to stay and in 1718 ‘A Machine or Engine for the Grinding of Colours’ was invented by Marshall Smith of England. His machine greatly improved the grinding of the pigments to form the paints. Not long after, a company known as Emerton Manby advertised their paint at really low prices due to this new machine.

The painting of houses quickly became very popular. Their advert read, ‘One Pound of Colour ground in a Horse-Mill will paint 12 yards of work, whereas Colour ground any other way will not do half of that quantity’.

By the arrival of the Industrial Revolution, paint was being ground in steam-powered mills and the lead in the paint was being replaced by a white derivative of zinc oxide. Into the 19th Century, many houses were painted inside. This was not just for the decorative value, but also because paint helped to stop the walls rotting, as well as reducing the damp. By this time, linseed oil was a common additive to paint, as it was a cheap binding agent.

Sherwin Williams First Tin of Paint

Sherwin Williams First Tin of Paint

In 1866, the first paint to be used straight from a tin was invented by Sherwin Williams in the USA. It took him nearly ten years to perfect, but eventually he had a huge production plant set up and was exporting all around the world.

Paint was here in a big way, but then in during World War II, there was a shortage of linseed oil for the paint manufacturers, as it was needed by the forces, so artificial resins were invented to take its place.

They turned out to be easy and cheap to make, with the added advantage of holding the colour. They also gave a longer life to the paint and so were used in future paint production.

So, next time you wander down the paint aisles in your local DIY store, deciding your colour and paint finish, you will know a little of its history and can impress the salesman…who I bet will not know any of these little information gems!

Jo Tempest.

Edmonstone Teaching Darwin

Edmonstone Teaching Darwin

John Edmonstone was thought to be born in Demara, Guyana, South America. He spent his early years as a black slave for Charles Edmonstone, a plantation owner in Demara, also taking his surname.

He spent a lot of time with Charles Waterton, the son-in-law of his owner. He and Charles were both interested in the nature of their surroundings, the plant, bird, and animal life. Charles taught John taxidermy which he found fascinating.

John was eventually freed from slavery and arrived in Glasgow, Scotland, England with his former owner, Charles Edmonstone. From there, he moved to 37, Lothian Street,Edinburgh, where he worked free-lance for the city University as a taxidermist, creating exhibits for their Natural History Museum.

John also earned extra money by teaching some of the University students taxidermy. This was when he met one of the most important men in our history…Charles Darwin, in 1826. Charles lived just a few doors down from John in Lothian Street, with his brother, Eramus. Charles paid John to teach him taxidermy and they spent a few weeks together, not only enjoying the taxidermy but discussing where John had lived and his wonderful environment.

They also talked about his years in slavery and this affected Charles Darwin deeply. (He would become an avid supporter of slavery abolition in his later years) Writing to his sister, Charles told her how he was being taught taxidermy by an intelligent, pleasant, freed black slave from Demara.

Charles Darwin left for his voyage on the H.M.S Beagle in 1831, inspired by John Edmonstone in so many ways, and John had been lucky enough to have spent an enviable short time with a man who would leave us his greatest discoveries. It was certainly a meeting that they both enjoyed and never forgot.
Jo Tempest.

New Year Greetings

Happy New Year

Happy New Year

I just want to take this opportunity to wish all you lovely readers a fantastic New year and I hope that 2015 brings you all that you wish for.

May your dreams become reality and you have a fabulous year.
Jo Tempest.

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